Greenmead Historical Park winter scene with Hill House in background
snowflake

FROZEN FUN- Limited tickets!

Join us for some FROZEN FUN at the Alexander Blue House on Saturday, Jan. 25, 2020 from 1-3 p.m. This children's event will have crafts, snacks, songs, and photos with your favorite Snow Queen! Princess and prince attire encouraged! Advance tickets are required for this event. $9 per child and $9 per adult. Limited tickets are available at the Greenmead Office in the Alexander Blue House, 20501 Newburgh, M-F, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please be prepared to pay with cash or check only. For more information and to check ticket availability, please call (248) 477-7375.

two tea cups with a valentine 'you suit me to a TEA valentine!'

Valentine's Day Tea- Limited tickets!

Join us for a delightful afternoon at the Valentine's Day Tea. This event will take place on Saturday, Feb. 8 from 3 - 5 p.m. at the Alexander Blue House at Greenmead, 20501 Newburgh Road. Attendees will enjoy a variety of delicious sandwiches, scones and desserts. A presentation will be provided as well! Advance tickets are required and are $30 per person. Limited tickets are available at the Greenmead Office, 20501 Newburgh Road. Please be prepared to pay with cash or check. For more information and to check ticket availability, please call (248) 477-7375.

Large logs being pulled by horses on sled

"Shanty Boys, Peaveys, and River Hogs- Michigan's Lumbering Days" presented by the Livonia Historical Society

Join the Livonia Historical Society on Monday, Jan. 20, 2020 at 2 p.m. for their meeting and a presentation by speaker Rochelle Balkam. This event takes place in the Alexander Blue House at Greenmead, 20501 Newburgh Road. All are welcome to attend this free event. Membership information will be available at the meeting. For more information, please call (248) 477-7375.

Late in the 19th century, Michigan had more millionaires than nearly every other state. The names of those lumber barons are part of Michigan’s story: David Whitney, Arthur Hill, Henry Sage, William Atwood, Charles Hackley and Henry Crapo. Lumber was “green gold”, worth more than the gold from California’s Gold Rush. The way of life for the lumberjacks, or shanty boys as they called themselves, was unique to them. Everything at the lumber camp had a name: widow-maker, Gabriel’s horn, river hogs, swampers, skidders, big wheel, log mark, and the most important person, cookee (cook.)

Powered by
CivicSend - A product of CivicPlus